[Issue 77] Media Monitoring: Extract of Press News on Higher Education in Africa


  1. University World News

Report calls for research focus beyond biomedicine (Mozambique)

Enrolment in tertiary education in Mozambique may have multiplied more than seven times in the past 15 years, but it has not expanded postgraduate studies or promoted high-quality research and innovation, according to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In a key study, “Mapping Research and Innovation in the Republic of Mozambique”, UNESCO noted that limited funding of university education has increased its fragility and stifled the tertiary gross enrolment ratio (GER). GER is the total enrolment in tertiary education, regardless of age expressed as a percentage of the population in the five-year age group immediately following upper secondary education. Still, Mozambique made notable enrolment gains, as it increased the number of university students from 28,298 in 2005 to 213,930 in 2018, reflecting a participation rate of 7.3% in terms of the GER. But the main issue is that Mozambique’s tertiary system is highly focused on undergraduate studies, while postgraduate programmes are underdeveloped, especially at doctoral level. “For instance, in 2018, only two PhDs were awarded at Eduardo Mondlane University, which is the leading university in the country,” stated the study that was launched in Paris on 18 February. In this regard, the low performance of higher education at postgraduate level has contributed to a scenario in which most academics and researchers have no doctoral qualifications. “Across the system as a whole, as of 2016, only 14% of all researchers in Mozambique possessed a doctoral degree and, among them, only 20% were women,” stated the UNESCO study. Although women make up 45% of all university enrolments, their share of enrolment in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields is about 30%. Data in the report indicate women are concentrated in business, administration and law (37%), education (27%) and health (15%). But, even as women continue to close the gender gap in higher education, the report noted only 26% of the academic staff in tertiary education are women. Mozambique’s research is also struggling for lack of high-quality researchers.

 Read more here

2. News Day

African universities’ science faculties a mockery (Africa)

African universities should discontinue their science faculties and concentrate their financial resources on the development of the arts, histories and music than misrepresent the sciences through presenting fake and passive models of the discipline of science. It is undoubtedly well-known that proper tertiary education ought to focus on the exploitation of local content, resources and solving of contemporary problems for the benefit of all. For example, apart from focusing on philosophies to advance humanity during ancient times, Greeks developed schools of medicine to treat diseases and pandemics of the time. Hippocrates, a Greek doctor founded the first medical school at the island of Kos in Greece in 500 BCE. The point I am making here is that an expectation raised and still unfulfilled is an affront to the well-being of the expectant. Such an expectation would be better off not raised at all, hence my suggestion that science faculties at universities in Africa should be discontinued because they raise developmental expectations that are not realised. They are largely a waste of resources that could be used effectively elsewhere. Africa is well endowed with the world’s mineral resources far more than any other continent on plannet earth. It, therefore, becomes logical that if we are to heed the divine principle that we are stewards and the more we are given the more we shall account for. For Africa to be comnensurate with her bountiful endowment of mineral resources, she should excel more than any other continent in the processing of her mineral resources to benefit her citizens. It, therefore, becomes logical that if we are to heed the divine principle that we are stewards and the more we are given the more we shall account for. For Africa to be comnensurate with her bountiful endowment of mineral resources, she should excel more than any other continent in the processing of her mineral resources to benefit her citizens. Such knowledge can be attained from the universities’ faculties of science. It is also known that no country can create incremental wealth for its people without engaging in the processing of its resources — manufacturing.

Read more here

Download

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: